Fiber In Metal Tubes Overview | NBG Customized Fiber Optic Solutions

FIBER OPTIC ENCAPSULATION

Fiber in metal tube (FIMT)

Over 80.000 possible configurations, each suitable for multiple applications. 

Cable layers

Stainless Steel Tubes can be combined with additional layers, which do not necessarily need to be a metal tube too. 

Stainless Steel Tubes can be combined with additional layers.

Additional metal layers

Stranding wire

Plastic

Aluminum

Common Stainless Steel Grades:

ASTM/AISI/ANSI

EN #

304

1.4301

304L

1.4306

316L

1.4404

316Ti

1.4571

Common Nickel Alloy Grades:

ASTM/AISI/ANSI

EN #

Alloy 825

2.4858

Alloy 625

2.4856

Invar 36

1.3912

Filling compound

In general, filling compounds for Fiber in Metal Tubes are used to protect the fibers from moisture and mechanical stress. 

  • Wide temperature range:
    – 60° up to + 200 °C
  • High, medium or without hydrogen scavenging properties
  • Short-term exposure up to + 300 °C
  • Full synthetic thixotropic compound
  • Non-toxic

Optical fiber

Diameter, coating, bend resistance & coloring are all things that must be considered when choosing fiber a type.

We split fiber into two main categories:

Common Standard Fiber Types:

  • G.652.D
  • G.657.A1
  • G.657.A2
  • G.655
  • etc.


Common Speciality Fiber Types:

  • Copper Coated Fibers
  • Aluminum Coated Fibers
  • Gold Coated Fibers
  • Buffered Fibers
  • Polyimide Coated Fibers
  • etc.

Quality? We embody it.

All our FIMT products are delivered with a test report

The reports are in accordance to EN 10204 /2.2 and include the following tests:

How's FIMT made?

Peter Basic, our former head of R&D runs you through the FIMT production process.

Our latest FIMT insights

FIMT

Why excess fiber length (EFL) matters?

For application, where a stainless-steel tube is needed to protect optical fibers against the surrounding influence, one abbreviation is catching one of the most important attention to consider. The so called “EFL”.

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FIMT

FIMT, FIST, SST? Deciphering the abbreviations.

When you work or deal with cables which contain optical fiber, you probably noticed designations like “FIMT”, “FIST”, “SST” or maybe other abbreviations which are related to a fiber optic cable. But what do those abbreviations stand for exactly and what is the meaning behind these terms?

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